Healing can be an ugly process

Sokka looks pretty torn up, but it’s all signs of healthy skin regrowth and wound closure.


It looks burnt because the medicinal sprays and healed scabs are flaking off.


Yes, I am looking at your flank.

Badgerface, his momma, is all blue on one side because he’s been rubbing up against her for comfort despite being weaned.

He gets in and scraps for hay and grazes out in the pasture now, he’s gaining weight.  Probably can’t expect any fleece, but he is likely to be in good shape by October if his healing continues to progress.  This is rapid recovery, normally it would be another week or even longer to see this level of improvement.

Sokka is on the mend

He’s looking more filled out and we’re keeping him in Catron IV and iodine.  Another week and he has a good chance of getting right back to the proper weight just in time and even providing a little fleece in October.

There was a bad storm, but it left us mostly untouched, with a short power outage, not a days-long one.

How the lamb fleeces for the rest of the flock are coming along.

Here’s some lamb pics from earlier this week.


Clockwise from center, Dottie, Grey, Azula, Clovis and Brunhilde. Ripley is on the edge of the frame.


Better shot of both Dottie and Brunhilde.


In this picture are Dottie, Badgerface, Black N Tan, Zuko II, Brunhilde, Clovis and Katara. Goldie’s head is just out of the frame.


This picture is here because Lisa is. Usually hard to get shots of her.


Better angle to see the ram lambs.


Azula and Sokka before we got him separated out. His fleece was recovering well enough to throw us off.


One of the few shots I could get of Ripley’s amazing frosted fleece. She is hiding behind her momma Grey as she often do.


Sokka and his sister Toph.


This one is here because it’s another view of Ripley. That coloration is combined with a fluffy softness.


One of the rare head on shots of Ripley. She is massive. If I wanted to take a chance on a one winter breeding, she’s definitely the one.

Sokka is eating hearty and full of energy

I am not going to make any predictions, I’ve learnt at least that much with sheep the last few years, but he is going in the right direction and we’re going to let him spend the day hanging out with his flock tomorrow and see how that goes.

He’s got enough energy that he’s no longer easy to grab for checking his healing progress.  Which is good news.

The rest of the flock is doing ok, but we’ll try to check them later this week to see if they have anything going on.  Nobody looks to have the telltale matted wet wool when I’m giving hay though, which is good.  Apparently this time of year even in this climate is when flystrike is likeliest to occur, not high summer.  We should be out of risk season by the next of September though.  It’s getting cooler, the 50 degree nights are definitely speeding his recovery even if the 85 degree days are not exactly helping it.

Sokka got flystrike

No pictures, went ahead and called the vet.  Husband and I had to shear/trim the infected areas where, well, flies had gotten in.  DO NOT IMAGE SEARCH FOR FLY STRIKE OR FLYSTRIKE.  Unless you have a strong stomach.

Apparently it happens to lambs even in cooler climates like ours.  Hopefully the little guy will pull through.

The Adventures of Sokka, the latest flock fence fool

Sokka, in the eternal quest for that leaf on the other side of the fence, got his horns stuck overnight and couldn’t move for hours.  Ironically, if he’d had scurs, there is a good chance they would have just snapped off.  But he has true horns. I was not certain until this incident, but I sure found out right away.  Anyway because it was just his horns, his only problem was dehydration and fatigue.

I found him because I always make sure there are 14 sheep in the field when I give hay or pellets and go looking if they aren’t all there.  And there were only 13.  So I go up the mountain and find him stuck and breathing hard.  I got him some water and massaged his legs, which had gone to sleep when the rest of him hadn’t.  He had a lot of trouble standing upright, but still had an appetite and took the water, so we were optimistic.  He was scared, but willing to try standing once he had some water in him.

I stayed with him for a while, letting him try to stand and keeping him from rolling onto his back.  By the time my husband could be home to help, he was limp-walking on his own for a few feet.  We got some Nutri-Drench in him and he rallied after that, walking all the way down the mountain to join the flock.  They were solicitous and welcomed him back.

So far he is eating and drinking pretty normally, and spending a lot of time sitting around.  If he makes it through today, he is probably fine.  And as is always the case with the sheep, once he was walking normally, he moved away from the two-legs who saved his life as fast as his little lamb legs could take him.